oolong tea > black tea > roasted tea). The relative reducing power and DPPH scavenging activity decreased in the following order: green tea > roasted tea > oolong tea > black tea. Also, green tea was more'>
Go to Home Page...
 
Web Level1Diet.com
 
Home Foods to Eat Foods to Avoid Exercise Supplements Weight Loss News Diabetes News Your Concerns Archived Reports

Bookmark Us: Yahoo Del.icio.us Simpy Technorati Email a friend Print



Comparison of the antioxidant activity of roasted tea with green, oolong, and black teas.

<< Prev Report
Refine Your Search:

All Words Any Words
Next Report >>


Although the antioxidant properties of green, oolong, and black teas have been well studied, antioxidant activity has not been examined in roasted tea. Therefore, in the current studies, we investigated the antioxidant activity of roasted tea in comparison with those of green, oolong, and black teas. Using water extracts of the various teas, we examined the total phenolic content as well as the antioxidant activities, including the reducing power, the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, and the inhibition of hemolysis caused by 2,2'-azo-bis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH)-induced lipid oxidation in erythrocyte membranes. The roasted tea contained lower levels of total phenolics than green, oolong, or black tea (green tea > oolong tea > black tea > roasted tea). The relative reducing power and DPPH scavenging activity decreased in the following order: green tea > roasted tea > oolong tea > black tea. Also, green tea was more effective against AAPH-induced erythrocyte hemolysis than other teas (green tea>roasted tea = oolong tea = black tea). These results suggest that roasted tea is beneficial to health, in humans, because of its high antioxidant activity. Publication Types: Comparative Study, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't


Keywords: green oolong, antioxidant activity, aaph induced, scavenging activity, reducing power, black teas, roasted, black, oolong, activity, antioxidant

Authored by Satoh E, Tohyama N, Nishimura M. Research Center for Animal Hygiene and Food Safety, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro 080-8555, Japan. es@obihiro.ac.jp

Published in Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2005 Dec;56(8):551-9. The full report is available online. link   A subscription to the periodical may be required.



<< Prev Report Next Report >>










* All information on Level1Diet.com is for educational purposes only. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Before changing your diet, or adding supplements to your diet, or beginning an exercise program, everyone should consult a qualified and licensed health practitioner; a physician, dietician or similar professional.




spacer spacer
spacer
   


DO YOU KNOW ?
Over 1,532 new health studies are published every day ― 559,288 per year. Join our weekly update program to stay informed...
spacer

spacer
» About Health Updates



Donate a few dollars
to help us promote
anti-inflammatory health.


spacer
Bigger Font Size Smaller Font Size Left Align Justify Align Right Align Bookmark This Page
spacer
Search 1.49 Million
Health Studies


» List of 4,000+ Diseases
spacer
   

spacer
Recommended
Resources
diabetes alternative medicine
VitaNet Health Food Store
Nouveau Riche University Blog
Nouveau Riche University
treadmills
Cenegenics






 
About Us Contact Us Privacy Free Newsletter Health FAQs Terms of Use
© 2008 Level1Diet.com, All Rights Reserved.     Contact: